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Reliability Society [R-7]

6:00 PM, Wednesday, 11 June

A Guide to the Revised IEEE 730 Software Quality Assurance Standard

The IEEE has updated and added significant content to its IEEE 730 standard on Software Quality Assurance (SQA). The new version, which updates the previous version of 2002, describes three process areas and sixteen SQA tasks within these areas providing detailed elaborations for these areas and tasks. It also provides an overview of the key concepts of SQA, including its relation to product requirements, the relationship between project and organizational quality management, the relationship between supplier and acquirer (customer), and the overall flow of product and process requirements.

The focus of this meeting is to provide a brief overview of these areas and tasks, discuss the difference between SQA and testing, covering SQA in an Agile software development lifecycle, and cover the annexes in IEEE 730 that provide industry-specific information as well as the relationships with software process approaches such as CMMI, SPICE, CSQE, PMBOK, and VSEs.

David I. Heimann received a B.S. in Mathematics from City College of New York, an M.S. in Mathematics from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. is in Computer Science from Purdue. He holds certifications as a Certified Software Quality Engineer (CSQE), Certified Six Sigma Green Belt (CSSGB), and Certified Reliability Engineer (CRE). He has held positions in government, industry, and academia, performing work and activities in software analysis and metrics, software process improvement, database management systems, reliability modeling, simulation, and probabilistic modeling.

His experience includes serving as Metrics Lead for a key update of a company's flagship voicemail product, guiding metrics collection and interpretation for an automation and instrumentation company using Agile development, and automating the collection of software complexity data for use of developers and testers for a major computer company's operating system. He is currently on the Technical Working Group developing the upcoming new version of the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Standard 730 for Software Quality Assurance.

This meeting will be held on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA. It will begin with personal networking at 5:30 PM. The presentation will follow at 6:00 PM. Refreshments, compliments of the Reliability Chapter, will be available. You do not need to belong to IEEE to attend this event; however we welcome your consideration of IEEE memberships as career enhancing technical affiliations. We request that you register to attend by Friday, June 6, so we can plan the refreshments.

You can register on-line by visiting the Reliability Chapter website at http://www.ieee.org/bostonrel

MIT Lincoln Laboratory is located at 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02411.

Directions to Lincoln Laboratory: (from Interstate-95 / Route 1111)

From the north (southbound): Take Exit 31B and merge onto Routes 4/225 towards Bedford, Stay in right lane and go 0.3 miles from exit. Use Right Turning Lane just before traffic light to access Hartwell Ave. at 1st Traffic Light. Follow Hartwell Ave. for about 1.2 miles to Wood St. Turn left onto Wood Street and drive 0.3 mile. Turn right into MIT Lincoln Laboratory at the Wood Street Gate. Have a valid driver’s license to present to security: Attending the IEEE Reliability presentation in the cafeteria.

From the south (northbound)

Take Exit 30B and merge onto Route 2A - Stay in right lane. Go about 0.4 miles to second traffic light and turn right on to Mass. Ave (opposite Minuteman Tech.). Follow Mass. Ave for ~ 0.4 miles. Turn left onto Wood Street and drive for 1.0 mile.

Turn left into MIT Lincoln Lab at the Wood Street Gate. Have a valid driver’s license to present to security: Attending the IEEE Reliability presentation in the cafeteria.

Park in the Visitor Parking area. To get to the Cafeteria, proceed toward the Main Entrance of MIT Lincoln Laboratory, but before entering the building, proceed down the stairs hidden to the left of the Main Entrance. Turn right at the bottom of the stairs and enter the building through the Cafeteria entrance. The Cafeteria is located directly ahead.

Web map link: http://www.ll.mit.edu/about/map.html


6:00 PM, Wednesday, 14 May

Personal Power and the Art of Perception

Our business team contributions are dependent on two elements: • What is the actual value of our message, and • What is the perceived value of the messenger.

Unfortunately, many great ideas get suggested but do not produce great results. Results require implementation and good implementation requires good team acceptance.

A leadership attribute might be called Personal Power or another term is charisma. Webster defines Power as the ability to do anything - physical, mental, spiritual, legal; the capacity to produce an effect. Regardless of what it is called, the amount of it we communicate is a very big factor for our results.

This presentation will examine these Personal Power factors. This session examines some conscious and unconscious behaviors and how they can influence the actions of others. It explains some reasons why people react in the ways that they do. It also explains what you can do to alter the reactions to better match your goals.

Through interactive participation, this presentation analyzes how we influence the perceptions of others about who we are and how others elicit certain behaviors from us. You will learn how to recognize the link between some behaviors with their outcomes. You will be taught how to change these behavior patterns if you want different results.

Managers will expand their understanding of the interrelationships between their behavior and the employee’s contributions. Subordinates will deepen their insight about how they are viewed by management and how specific perceptions are formed. Most importantly, you will learn how to implement your new understanding to create desired outcomes.

Come join us for this enlightening examination into the human side of our business world. Use this new knowledge to empower yourself and others to improve your results.

Leslie Avis Gabriele PhotoLeslie Avis Gabriele earned her MBA at Boston College. Her recruiting career ranges from start-ups to Fortune 50's, from individual contributors to presidents for a wide variety of industries and disciplines. She founded Gabriele & Company in 1993. At McInturff & Associates, she established the manufacturing practice. At Fenwick Partners / Korn Ferry, she completed search engagements for top level executives. Leslie is the founder of the VP of Operations Group, past Chair of the Boston chapter of the SME, past board member of ASQC, APICS, and steering committee member for the Manufacturing Roundtable.

This meeting will be held on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 at at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA. It will begin with personal networking at 5:30 PM. The presentation will follow at 6:00 PM. Refreshments, compliments of the Reliability Chapter, will be available. You do not need to belong to IEEE to attend this event; however we welcome your consideration of IEEE memberships as career enhancing technical affiliations. We request that you register to attend by Friday, May 9, so we can plan the refreshments.

You can register on-line by visiting the Reliability Chapter website at http://www.ieee.org/bostonrel

MIT Lincoln Laboratory is located at 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02414.

Directions to Lincoln Laboratory: (from Interstate-95 / Route 1414)

From the north (southbound):Take Exit 31B and merge onto Routes 4/225 towards Bedford. Stay in right lane and go 0.3 miles from exit. Use Right Turning Lane just before traffic light to access Hartwell Ave. at 1st Traffic Light. Follow Hartwell Ave. for about 1.2 miles to Wood St.. Turn left onto Wood Street and drive 0.3 mile. Turn right into MIT Lincoln Laboratory at the Wood Street Gate. Have a valid driver’s license to present to security: Attending the IEEE Reliability presentation in the cafeteria.

From the south (northbound)

Take Exit 30B and merge onto Route 2A - Stay in right lane. Go about 0.4 miles to second traffic light and turn right on to Mass. Ave (opposite Minuteman Tech.).Follow Mass. Ave for ~ 0.4 miles. Turn left onto Wood Street and drive for 1.0 mile. Turn left into MIT Lincoln Lab at the Wood Street Gate. Have a valid driver’s license to present to security: Attending the IEEE Reliability presentation in the cafeteria.

Park in the Visitor Parking area. To get to the Cafeteria, proceed toward the Main Entrance of MIT Lincoln Laboratory, but before entering the building, proceed down the stairs hidden to the left of the Main Entrance. Turn right at the bottom of the stairs and enter the building through the Cafeteria entrance. The Cafeteria is located directly ahead.

Web map link: http://www.ll.mit.edu/about/map.html


6:00 PM, Tuesday, 8 April

Increasing Data Availability and Reliability using Data Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems (DDS)

Bert Farabaugh

As intelligent systems become more complex and even more distributed, the flow of data between components is facing increasing challenges on delivery, timing, availability and reliability. The specification for DDS (Data Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems) was created to provide an easier way for applications to share data while addressing the real-time characteristics on its behavior. This session will explore various case studies of where DDS is being used today and the typical problems that it is solving for those applications. To enable a better understanding of DDS, there will be a technical introduction of the capabilities of DDS, concentrating on functionality to provide reliability, availability, fault tolerance and data management. Time permitting, a demonstration will be given to enhance the understanding of these concepts and capabilities as provided by DDS. In today's world, no system can be reliable or fault tolerant if data security is not taken into account. A description of the current work at the OMG on DDS Data Security will also be presented.

Bert Farabaugh is Worldwide Field Applications Engineering Manager at RTI. He works with customers to identify and develop solutions and design patterns tailored for their projects. Bert has over 16 years of experience developing networking protocols and communications design patterns from scratch for robotics and embedded systems. He has been a field applications engineer for the past 10 years, with hundreds of different applications in his portfolio. RTI (Real-Time Innovations) is the world's largest embedded middleware provider, privately held and headquartered in Sunnyvale, California.

This meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA. Please note that this monthly meeting is taking place on a ‘Tuesday’ instead of the regular ‘Wednesday’ monthly meetings. It will begin with personal networking at 5:30 PM. The presentation will follow at 6:00 PM. Refreshments, compliments of the Reliability Chapter, will be available. You do not need to belong to IEEE to attend this event; however we welcome your consideration of IEEE memberships as career enhancing technical affiliations. We request that you register to attend by Friday, April 4, so we can plan the refreshments.

You can register on-line by visiting the Reliability Chapter website at http://www.ieee.org/bostonrel

MIT Lincoln Laboratory is located at 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 0248.

Directions to Lincoln Laboratory: (from Interstate-95 / Route 88)
From the north (southbound):

Take Exit 31B and merge onto Routes 4/225 towards Bedford

Stay in right lane and go 0.3 miles from exit.

Use Right Turning Lane just before traffic light to access Hartwell Ave. at 1st Traffic Light.

Follow Hartwell Ave. for about 1.2 miles to Wood St.

Turn left onto Wood Street and drive 0.3 mile.

Turn right into MIT Lincoln Laboratory at the Wood Street Gate

Have a valid driver’s license to present to security:

Attending the IEEE Reliability presentation in the cafeteria.

From the south (northbound)

Take Exit 30B and merge onto Route 2A - Stay in right lane

Go about 0.4 miles to second traffic light and turn right on to Mass. Ave (opposite Minuteman Tech.).

Follow Mass. Ave for ~ 0.4 miles.

Turn left onto Wood Street and drive for 1.0 mile.

Turn left into MIT Lincoln Lab at the Wood Street Gate

Have a valid driver’s license to present to security:

Attending the IEEE Reliability presentation in the cafeteria.

Park in the Visitor Parking area. To get to the Cafeteria, proceed toward the Main Entrance of MIT Lincoln Laboratory, but before entering the building, proceed down the stairs hidden to the left of the Main Entrance. Turn right at the bottom of the stairs and enter the building through the Cafeteria entrance. The Cafeteria is located directly ahead.

Web map link: http://www.ll.mit.edu/about/map.html