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Microwave Theory and Technique Society [MTT-17]

Antenna & Propagation; Microwave Theory & Techniques; Aerospace & Electronic Systems and Electron Devices Societies

3:00 PM, Tuesday, 20 May

Operating Electrically Small Antennas for High Information Bandwidths

Guest Lecturer: Prof. Ramakrishna Janaswamy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Location: MITRE (Building C Lobby)

Refreshments served at 2:30pm

You can also attend the meeting from the comfort of your office/home through WebEx. Please see below for login info.

It is well known that electrically small (size to be much smaller than the wavelength at the operating carrier frequency), passive antennas suffer from fundamental limitations on achievable bandwidths. The bandwidth of electrically small antennas could, however, be substantially improved by incorporating lossy matching networks. But this will be at the cost of significantly higher power dissipation in the matching networks, which will tend to decrease the overall radiation efficiency. If, on the other hand, the antenna currents could somehow be made to change rapidly at a rate directly dictated by the message signal, then there is no difficulty in radiating such a rapidly varying waveform from the induced antenna currents, despite its narrow input impedance bandwidth.

In this talk we discuss the theory of operation of a linear, electrically small, time-varying antenna by considering a thin dipole loaded with a fast switching element. Time-variation of antenna structure is achieved by operating the switch via a message signal that has the overall effect of transferring a modulated carrier to antenna currents for subsequent radiation.

Time-domain integral equation and linear state-space theory is used to understand the dynamics of the radiated waveform and the antenna input current. It is demonstrated that the antenna has capabilities of radiating waveforms with an information bandwidth that is an order of magnitude greater than possible with an electrically small traditional antenna. Effect of switch parameters such as the finite OFF resistance and finite switching times relative to the time period of the RF carrier on the operation of the antenna are also presented.

Ramakrishna Janaswamy PhotoBio: Ramakrishna Janaswamy received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering in 1986 from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He received his Master’s degree in Microwave and Radar Engineering from IIT-Kharagpur, India in 1983 and the Bachelor’s degree in Electronics and Communications Engineering from REC-Warangal (now NITWarangal), India in 1981. From August 1986 to May 1987, he was an Assistant Professor of electrical engineering at Wilkes University, Wilkes Barre, PA. From August 1987-August 2001 he was on the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. In September 2001 he joined the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where he is a currently a Professor. He was a visiting researcher at the Center for PersonKommunikation, Aalborg, Denmark from September 1997 to June 1998 and spent the Summers of 1994 and 1995 at SPAWARSYSCEN, San Diego, California and NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, respectively. His research interests include deterministic and stochastic radio wave propagation modeling, analytical and computational electromagnetics, antenna theory and design, and wireless communications. His research is/was funded by several agencies such as NSF, ONR, ARO, and several Department of Navy laboratories. His personal hobbies include birdwatching and wildlife photography.

Rama Janaswamy is a Fellow of IEEE and was the recipient of the R. W. P. King Prize Paper Award of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation in 1995. For his services to the IEEE Monterey Bay Subsection, he received the IEEE 3rd Millennium Medal from the Santa Clara Valley Section in 2000. He is an elected member of U.S. National Committee of International Union of Radio Science, Commissions B and F. He served as an Associate Editor of Radio Science from January 1999-January 2004 and Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology from 2003-2006. He is currently an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation and of the IETE (India) Technical Reviews. He is the author of the book Radiowave Propagation and Smart Antennas for Wireless Communications, Kluwer Academic Publishers, November 2000 and a contributing author in Handbook of Antennas in Wireless Communications, L. Godara (Ed.), CRC Press, August 2001 and Encyclopedia of RF and Microwave Engineering, K. Chang (Ed.), John Wiley & Sons, 2005.

For more information, contact:

Raoul O. Ouedraogo, raoul.ouedraogo@ll.mit.edu or

Wajih Elsallal, welsallal@mitre.org, Phone:(319) 775-5296

Foreign nationals should RSVP by contacting Wajih Elsallal no later than 5/15/2014

Direction to MITRE:

Refer to the link below. Please use the lobby at C-building.

http://www.mitre.org/sites/default/files/pdf/bedford-campus-map.pdf

WebEx instruction:

Please login at 2.45pm to give yourself enough time for troubleshooting connection problem.

Meeting information

opic: Operating Electrically Small Antennas for High Information Bandwidths

Date: Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Time: 3:00 pm, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)

Meeting Number: 596 891 596

Meeting Password: (This meeting does not require a password.)

To start or join the online meeting

Go to https://ieeemeetings.webex.com/ieeemeetings/j.php?ED=284339862&UID=498391877&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D

Provide your phone number when you join the meeting to receive a call back.

Teleconference information

Alternatively, you can call:

Call-in toll-free number: 1-866-2030920 (US)

Call-in number: 1-206-4450056 (US)

Conference Code: 796 395 4371


6:00 PM, Thursday, 15 May

Microwave and Millimeter Wave Power Amplifiers: Technology, Applications, Benchmarks, and Future Trends

Dr. James J. Komiak

Phone: +1 (603) 885-6910; Email: james.j.komiak@baesystems.com

Solid State Transistor Device Technologies covered include Si BJT, Si LDMOS, MESFET, HBT, PHEMT, InP HEMT, MHEMT, and GaN HEMT. Content includes principles of operation, structures, characteristics, classes of operation, and device state of the art benchmarks. Power amplifiers utilizing these device technologies covering UHF through Sub-Millimeter Wave are described including amplifier state of the art benchmarks. Applications include communications, radar, electronic warfare, and instrumentation.

James J. Komiak PhotoJames J. Komiak (M’89-SM’90-F'05) received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University in 1978. Dissertation research developed the “Real Frequency Technique” for broadband matching an arbitrary load to a resistive generator. He has 35 years experience in system, module, and MMIC design for EW, communication, and radar applications. Currently he is a BAE Systems Global Engineering/Scientific Fellow at the Electronic Systems MicroElectronics Center (MEC) in Nashua, NH. He has over 100 publications and 10 patents. Elected to the grade of IEEE Fellow in 2005 for “Contributions to Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits, High Power Amplifiers, and Transmit/Receive Modules.” Received the Martin Marietta Jefferson Cup Award--"Outstanding Technical Leadership in Development and Demonstration of High Power and High Efficiency Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit Amplifiers and T/R Modules for Phased Array Radar (June 1993)" and his work is represented in the MTT Symposium MMIC Historical Exhibit‑‑"World's First Octave Band MMIC with Power Output in Excess of 10 Watts (1989)". Silver Award Winner of the BAE Systems Chairman’s Award for Innovation for “Blue Force Locator & Monitor” (2001) and “Next Generation Power Amplifiers” (2012). Received the BAE Systems Engineering Fellows Leave A Legacy Award (2007). Inducted into the Association of Old Crows Electronic Warfare Hall of Fame in 2008. MTT-S, IMS TPC/TPRC, MTT-5, GaAs IC Symposium (2000 Chairman), former ABET ECE PEV, CEAA.

This meeting begins at 6:00 PM Thursday, May 15th, 2014 and will be located in the cafeteria at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420. The meeting is free and open to the public. All are welcome. Prior to the seminar there will be social time and networking from 5:30 - 6:00PM in the MIT Lincoln Laboratory cafeteria, the seminar will begin at 6:00PM. For more information contact Boston IEEE Microwave Theory & Techniques (MTT-17) and chair emails can be found at http://www.ieeeboston.org/org/chapter_chairs/chapter_chairs.html

Directions to Lincoln Laboratory: (from interstate I-95/Route 128). From Exit 31B. Take Exit 31B onto Routes 4/225 towards Bedford - Stay in right lane. Use Right Turning Lane (0.3 mile from exit) to access Hartwell Ave. at 1st Traffic Light. Follow Hartwell Ave. to Wood St. (~1.3 miles). Turn Left on to Wood Street and Drive for 0.3 of a mile.

Turn Right into MIT Lincoln Lab at the Wood Street Gate. Have a valid driver’s license to present to security.

From Exit 30B. Take Exit 30B on to Route 2A - Stay in right lane. Turn Right on to Mass. Ave (~ 0.4 miles - opposite Minuteman Tech.). Follow Mass. Ave for ~ 0.4 miles. Turn Left on to Wood Street and Drive for 1.0 mile. Turn Left into MIT Lincoln Lab at the Wood Street Gate. Have a valid driver’s license to present to security.

AAll attendees must present a valid driver's license to MIT Lincoln Laboratory security. To get to the Cafeteria, proceed toward the Main Entrance of Lincoln Laboratory. Before entering the building, proceed down the stairs located to the left of the Main Entrance. Turn right at the bottom of the stairs and enter the building through the Cafeteria entrance. The Cafeteria is located directly ahead.


Photonics; Nuclear & Plasma; and Microwave Theory & Techniques Societies

7:00 PM, Thursday, 10 April

Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuits for Telecommunications

Chris Doerr, Acacia Communications

As the complexity of optical transceivers for metro and long-haul fiber-optic links has risen, their costs are becoming prohibitive to keeping up with Internet growth. A solution is optical integration. This talk focuses on optical integration in silicon, which, with a sustainable foundry model and high-quality performance, is starting a new paradigm in telecom.

Christopher R. Doerr PhotoChristopher R. Doerr earned a B.S. in aeronautical engineering and a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He attended MIT on an Air Force scholarship and earned pilot wings in 1991. Since coming to Bell Labs in 1995, Doerr’s research has focused on integrated devices for optical communication. He has created many photonic circuits in InP, silica, and silicon and has over 130 patents.

He was promoted to Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2000, received the OSA Engineering Excellence Award in 2002, and became an IEEE Fellow in 2006, an OSA Fellow in 2009, and a Bell Labs Fellow in 2011. Doerr was Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Photonics Technology Letters from 2007-2009. He was awarded the William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award in 2009. He was promoted to Technical Manager in 2010. In 2011 he joined Acacia Communications as Director of Integrated Photonics. He is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Lightwave Technology. He is currently a program chair for the Optical Fiber Communication Conference.

He draws cartoons for the IEEE Photonics Society News. He is married to Neriko Musha and has two children.

Recommended Reading: R. Nagarajan, C. Doerr, and F. Kish, “Semiconductor Photonic Integrated Circuit Transmitters and Receivers,” in in Optical Fiber Telecommunications VI, 2013. Open-Access link on Google Books.

This meeting begins at 6:30 PM Thursday, April 10th, 2014 and will be located in the cafeteria at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420. The meeting is free and open to the public. All are welcome. Prior to the seminar there will be social time and networking from 6:30 - 7:00PM in the MIT Lincoln Laboratory cafeteria, the seminar will begin at 7:00PM. For more information contact David Scherer, Boston IEEE Photonics Society Chapter chair at david.scherer@microsemi.com, or visit the Boston IEEE Photonics Society website at www.bostonphotonics.org.

Directions to Lincoln Laboratory: (from interstate I-95/Route 128)

From Exit 31B

Take Exit 31B onto Routes 4/225 towards Bedford - Stay in right lane

Use Right Turning Lane (0.3 mile from exit) to access Hartwell Ave. at 1st Traffic Light.

Follow Hartwell Ave. to Wood St. (~1.3 miles).

Turn Left on to Wood Street and Drive for 0.3 of a mile.

Turn Right into MIT Lincoln Lab at the Wood Street Gate

Have a valid driver’s license to present to security.

From Exit 30B

Take Exit 30B on to Route 2A - Stay in right lane

Turn Right on to Mass. Ave (~ 0.4 miles - opposite Minuteman Tech.).

Follow Mass. Ave for ~ 0.4 miles.

Turn Left on to Wood Street and Drive for 1.0 mile.

Turn Left into MIT Lincoln Lab at the Wood Street Gate

Have a valid driver’s license to present to security.

AAll attendees must present a valid driver's license to MIT Lincoln Laboratory security. To get to the Cafeteria, proceed toward the Main Entrance of Lincoln Laboratory. Before entering the building, proceed down the stairs located to the left of the Main Entrance. Turn right at the bottom of the stairs and enter the building through the Cafeteria entrance. The Cafeteria is located directly ahead.

Quantum Optics / Engineering Workshop:

April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 2014, 7–9:30 PM, see full schedule at www.bostonphotonics.org


Geoscience & Remote Sensing; Aerospace & Electronic Systems; Power Electronics; Magnetics; Instrumentation and Measurement; Microwave Theory & Techniques; and Antennas & Propagation Societies

6:00 PM, Wednesday, 9 April

Multiferroic Heterostructures and Low-Power Devices for Sensing, Power, RF and Microwave Electronics

Prof. Nian X. Sun, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Northeastern University, Boston.
Phone: +1 (617) 373-3351 Email: nian@ece.neu.edu

The coexistence of electric polarization and magnetization in multiferroic materials provides great opportunities for realizing magnetoelectric coupling, including electric field control of magnetism, or vice versa, through a strain mediated magnetoelectric interaction effect in layered magnetic/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures [1-7]. Strong magnetoelectric coupling has been the enabling factor for different multiferroic devices, which however has been elusive, particularly at RF/microwave frequencies. In this presentation, I will cover the most recent progress on novel Nian Sun Photolayered microwave multiferroic heterostructures and devices, which exhibit strong magnetoelectric coupling. We will demonstrate strong magnetoelectric coupling in novel microwave multiferroic heterostructures. These multiferroic heterostructures exhibit a giant voltage tunable magnetic field of 3500 Oe, and a high electrostatically tunable ferromagnetic resonance frequency range between 1.75~ 7.57 GHz, a tunable frequency of 5.82 GHz or fmax/fmin=4.3 [2,3]. At the same time, we will demonstrate E-field modulation of anisotropic magnetoresistance, giant magnetoresistance and exchange bias at room temperature in different multiferroic heterostructures [4]. New multiferroic devices will also be covered in the talk, including ultra-sensitive nanoelectromechanical systems magnetoelectric sensors with picoTesla sensitivity [5], multiferroic voltage tunable bandpass filters [6], voltage tunable inductors [7], tunable bandstop filters, tunable phase shifters and spintronics, etc.

1. N.X. Sun and G. Srinivasan, SPIN, 02, 1240004 (2012); 2. J. Lou, et al., Advanced Materials, 21, 4711 (2009); 3. . J. Lou, et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 112508 (2009) 4; M. Liu, et al. Advanced Functional Materials, 21, 2593 (2011); 5. T. Nan, et al. Scientific Reports, 3, 1985 (2013); 6. M. Liu, et al. Advanced Materials, 25, 1435 (2013); 7 M. Liu, et al. Advanced Functional Materials, 19, 1826 (2009).

Nian Sun Photo 2Nian Sun is an associate professor at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Northeastern University. He received his Ph.D. degree from Stanford University. Prior to joining Northeastern University, he was a Scientist at IBM and Hitachi Global Storage Technologies. Dr. Sun was the recipient of the NSF CAREER Award, ONR Young Investigator Award, the Søren Buus Outstanding Research Award, etc. His research interests include novel magnetic, ferroelectric and multiferroic materials, devices and subsystems. He has over 150 publications and over 20 patents and patent disclosures. One of his papers was selected as the “ten most outstanding full papers in the past decade (2001~2010) in Advanced Functional Materials”. Dr. Sun has given over 70 invited or keynote presentations in national and international conferences and universities. He is an editor of IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, and a fellow of the Institute of Physics and of the Institution of Engineering and Technology.

Refreshments will be served at 5:30PM at Northeastern University, Burlington Campus: Kostas Research Institute for Homeland Security, 141 South Bedford Street, Burlington, MA 01803.

Registration is encouraged https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/meeting_view/list_meeting/24217