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Life Members Society

Life Members; and Aerospace & Electronic Systems

4:00 PM, Friday 16 May

Deer Island Wastewater Treatment Plant: Basic Process Overview and Major Project Initiatives

Richard J. Adams, Deputy Director, Engineering Services, Deer Island Treatment Plant

The Deer Island Treatment Plant (DITP) provides wholesale and wastewater services to over 2.5 million customers in 61 communities in Massachusetts. DITP is the second largest treatment plant in North America. The plant has been in full operation for over 15 years. During this time, major equipment and infrastructure enhancements have taken place mainly due to energy efficiency initiatives, equipment life cycles and technology. The MWRA has experienced a number of unforeseen problems, ranging from corrosion due to the proximity of the marine and H2S environment that has necessitated a large portion of the infrastructure/equipment upgrades. In addition, the MWRA has also implemented a number of energy efficiency project ranging from hydro, wind and solar projects to recapturing waste heat recovery systems that has resulted in generating additional electricity that has significantly lowered its requirement to purchase power from the local utility. This discussion will provide an overview of the original construction; provide a basic understanding of how the wastewater treatment plant operates and to discuss past success and failure of infrastructure and equipment replacements.

Richard Adams received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University in 1987. He has been involved in the oversight of engineering and construction for on Deer Island for the past 19 years. Currently he is involved in oversight of a $650 million Capital Improvement program. Prior to this, he worked developing design and overseeing construction for electric utility and major manufacturing facilities.

For the previous 7 years, he has been managing the Engineering and Capital program for DITP. Through this period, he has been responsible for the oversight of over $250 million of design and construction projects ranging from Primary/Secondary Clarifiers rehabilitation, installation of 700 KW of solar arrays, installation of a 1.2 MW back pressure steam turbine (heat recovery), 1.2 MW of wind turbines and the installation of a central SCADA system to monitor and control 43 medium voltage electrical substations for Deer Island.

Before working for the MWRA, Mr. Adams worked for a local electric utility located in Westborough, MA and managed a number of distribution systems and energy efficiency programs for the utility.

The meeting will be held at the Lincoln Lab Auditorium, 244 Wood Street., Lexington, MA at 4:00 PM. Refreshments will be served at 3:30 PM. Registration is in the main lobby. Foreign national visitors to Lincoln Lab require visit requests. Please pre-register by e-mail to reception@ll.mit.edu and indicate your citizenship. Please use the Wood Street Gate. For directions go to http://www.ll.mit.edu/. For other information, contact Len Long, Chairman, at (781)894-3943, or l.long@ieee.org. or Steve Teahan at steahan@comcast.net. If you would like to be on the Life Members database so we can inform you of special programs including field trips plus added events like a global warming debate, please send us an e-mail with your contact information. This meeting is cosponsored by the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society (AESS).


Life Members; Electron Devices; and Aerospace & Electronic Systems

4:00 PM, Wednesday, 9 April

Anthropogenic Global Warming – Yea or Nay.

Paul H. Carr, Ph.D., AF Research Laboratory Emeritus

Thaddeus Paul Kochanski, Ph.D., (Ted) Sensors Signals Systems

Join the Life Members and the Electron Devices Society in debating: Anthropogenic Global Warming {“APG”} – Yea or Nay. We begin with two opening statements by the two advocates: Paul H. Carr: -- Yea – “Humans Influence Our Climate”; Thaddeus Paul Kochanski – Nay –“Natural Processes Dominate Climate Dynamics“

Humans Influence Our Climate
By Paul H. Carr, IEEE Life Fellow

Fossil fuel burning and agriculture of the exponentially growing population of seven billion are affecting our climate. Fossil fuel emissions include carbon dioxide (CO2) and aerosols. Fossil fuel mining and rice and livestock farming produce methane (CH4).

Increasing CO2 and other noncondensing atmospheric gases like CH4 blanket and warm the earth’s surface via the greenhouse effect. These increases correlate with temperature since the beginning of the industrial era. Carbon dating shows that the CO2 increase is from burning ancient fossil fuels.

The present CO2 rate-increase of 2.5 ppm/year is 300 times greater than that at which the earth recovered from the ice age 18,000 to 10,000 years ago.

If we do not take steps to reduce the 2.5 ppm/year rate, in 240 years CO2 concentrations will reach 1000 ppm. This is what the earth’s atmosphere was 50 million years ago. Then there was no ice, sea levels were hundreds of feet higher, and average temperatures were 11C higher.

The 2014 report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded, “There is a 95 percent or greater likelihood that human activity is the main cause of the ongoing planetary warming.”

Paul H. Carr. BS, MIT, Ph. D. Brandeis. From 1967 to 1995, Paul led the Component Technology Branch, of the Air Force Research Laboratory, Bedford, MA. His branch’s research on surface acoustic waves (SAW) resulted in signal processing filters used in radar, cellular phones, and TV. He has published over 80 technical papers and has 10 patents. After his retirement from AFRL, he taught philosophy courses at U Mass Lowell, which inspired his book Beauty in Science and Spirit. In January 2013, he published “Weather extremes from anthropogenic global warming,” in Natural Science. http://mirrorofnature.org/NS-GlobalWarming.pdf. His web page is www.MirrorOfNature.org

Natural Processes Dominate Climate Dynamics:

Are Climate Data & Models Reliable?
By Ted Kochanski

Before we can get to the ultimate question – we need to address:

My interest began, in the 1980's, while investigating atmospheric effects on low altitude RF propagation for the Navy. I experienced several instances of quality and reliability issues with archived ocean surface water and air temperature data in NOAA's National Climatic Data Center.

In June 1990, I attended a debate at MIT on Global Warming, between Pro -- Dr. Stephen Schneider of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, and Anti -- Richard S. Lindzen, MIT Sloan Professor of Meteorology. Afterwards, Prof. Lindzen, an atmospheric dynamics and modeling expert, told me that he accepted the surface temperature data. Being an experimentalist, I gave the modelers a “by” on the physics – my problem was with the data. Subsequently, I’ve seen many more examples of problems with: data sources, their interpretation, and modeling [e.g. cloud formation].

The remainder of the meeting will be devoted to members of the audience asking their own questions to further elucidate the topic.

Ted Kochanski, SB MIT, Ph.D. U Texas at Austin, Dr. Kochanski is a consultant, educator, and entrepreneur with a background in experimental physics, and extensive expertise in developing, and utilizing multiple sensor technologies to characterize, monitor and control diverse physical systems. His professional career spans: Tokamaks (University of Texas at Austin); Chair Technical Review Panel on Alpha Particle Diagnostics for Fusion Experiments; Defense System Analysis (MIT Lincoln Laboratory); Sensors Signals Systems – wide range of domestic and international clients in technology, applications, intellectual property; Entrepreneurship (co-founder of several high-tech companies); Engineering Education: university (UNH, WIT, International); continuing education (IEEE Boston Section); informal education (Museum of Science Exhibit Hall Interpretation Volunteer for 20 years).

The meeting will be held at the Lincoln Lab Auditorium, 244 Wood Street., Lexington, MA at 4:00 PM. Refreshments will be served at 3:30 PM. Registration is in the main lobby. Foreign national visitors to Lincoln Lab require visit requests. Please pre-register by e-mail to eception@ll.mit.edu and indicate your citizenship. Please use the Wood Street Gate. For directions go to http://www.ll.mit.edu/. For other information, contact Len Long, Co-Chair, at (781)894-3943, or l.long@ieee.org. or Steve Teahan, Co-Chair at 978-763-5136, or steahan@comcast.net. If you would like to be on the Life Members database so we can inform you of special programs including field trips plus added events like a global warming debate, please send us an e-mail with your contact information. This meeting is cosponsored by Aerospace and Electronic Systems (AESS), and Electron Devices (EDS) Societies.